Monday, December 21, 2009

How to make your AP Psych blog for those who still have not done so!!!

Look at the original assignment that I posted last June.

http://cantorsappsychologyblog.blogspot.com/2009_06_01_archive.html


Mr. C

Learning Blog Post Assignment : Due Jan 4th, 2010

Use the following links as well as chapter 6 in Bernstein to familiarize yourself with the main learning theorists and then make a blog post describing and comparing two of the theorists and their theories. For example, you could compare Ivan Pavlov and John Watson pointing out how Watson took Pavlov's Classical Conditioning and expanded it into the realm of emotion.

When you write your post on your blog (I hope you remember your password...) please post a comment on THIS POST with the URL of your blog so I can grade it and other students can see what you had to say.

You MUST proofread your blog post before putting it up. Be sure it makes sense and well written. I suggest writing your post in Word or another word processing program and then copying and pasting it into your blog.

Before you start writing please check out each of the links and jot down some notes so you are familiar with each learning theorist.

Pavlov


Reading about Pavlov
http://nobelprize.org/educational_games/medicine/pavlov/readmore.html

Pavlov Game
http://nobelprize.org/educational_games/medicine/pavlov/index.html

Zimbardo talks about Pavlov
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hhqumfpxuzI&feature=related

Pavlov’s dogs get conditioned
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CpoLxEN54ho&feature=player_embedded#

Jim conditions Dwight on The Office
http://www.strayneuron.com/blog/archives/420


John Watson



Little Albert is conditioned to fear furriness
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xt0ucxOrPQE

Skinner

BF Skinner explains operant conditioning
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AepqpTtKbwo

Pigeons playing “ping-pong” thanks to operant conditioning
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vGazyH6fQQ4&feature=related

Using operant conditioning to test to see if pigeons have “concepts” or schemas
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1kj6_7x4PY

Bandura


Albert Bandura explains his “Bobo doll” aggressiongexperiment
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vdh7MngntnI&feature=related

Albert Bandura en EspaƱol - Experimento sobre Agresividad
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uMwOexrV6fM&feature=related

Observational Learning– “Children see, children do” Commercial
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X_s9pG5CWXM&feature=fvw

How does reward or punishment affect social learning?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AmdTYwkHBI0

Please e-mail me with any questions. ptdworkin-cantor@cps.edu

-Mr. C

Wednesday, December 9, 2009

Quiz on Perception - Unit 5 coming up 12/16 (b) and 12/17 (a)

The quiz will cover Bernstein Chapter 5 as well as some review questions from Chapter 4 about sensation.


Be sure to have your Cornell Notes for all of Chapter 5 as well as your 33 flash cards done before the quiz.

Wednesday, December 2, 2009

Discovering Psychology Sensation and Perception Video



See Dr. Philip Zimbardo's psychology video series at http://www.learner.org/discoveringpsychology/index.html . The Sensation and Perception episode is at http://www.learner.org/discoveringpsychology/07/e07expand.html .


You need to click on the VoD button for "Video on Demand" on that page and make sure your pop-up blocker is disabled since a new window with the video in it will pop up when you click the VoD button.

Tuesday, November 24, 2009

If you missed the Unit 4 Sensation Quiz...

If you missed the quiz because you were absent or giving blood at the blood drive you will need to be ready to take it on 11/30 or 12/1 upon return from our Thanksgiving break.

Unit 5 - Perception Reading - Part one due on Mon. 11/30 (a) and Tues. 12/1 (b)

Bernstein Text Chapter 5 Pp. 150 – 192


Perception... How we make sense of our senses.

As you read the text take Cornell Notes and be sure you understand the concepts represented be the following questions:

Part 1 (pages 150-172) Mon. 11/30 and Tues. 12/1

  1. What is the “Perception Paradox?”
  2. Explain and compare the three main approaches to perception: ecological, constructivist, and computationalist.
  3. What is psychophysics? (not just Niebuhr, Moore and Guerrero being crazy)
  4. What is an “Absolute Threshold?”
  5. Explain the difference between “subliminal” and “supraliminal” perception.
  6. What do YOU think about the power of subliminal messages?
  7. What is “Signal Detection” theory?
  8. Describe what a “Just-noticeable Difference” is and explain “Weber’s Law.”
  9. Explain how Fechner’s law and Stevens’s Power Law relate to our perception of intensity of stimuli.
  10. Explain how our brains organize the perceptual world.
    • Figure- Ground, Grouping, Auditory Scene Analysis (Gestalt principles)
  11. Explain perception of distance and location
    • Two dimensional location
    • Depth Perception via: interposition, relative size, height in visual field, texture gradients, linear perspective, motion parallax.
    • Accommodation, convergence and binocular disparity in visual system.
  12. Explain perception of motion

· Looming, stroboscopic motion

  1. Why do we perceive consistency in our world when our sense data is always changing? Explain perceptual consistency.

· Size, Shape and Brightness consistency.


Part 2 (pages 173-192) Due Wed. 12/2 and Thurs. 12/3

  1. How do culture, and experience shape perception of reality?
  2. Explain the concepts of “Bottom-Up” and “Top-Down” processing.
  3. What is the parallel distributed processing (PDP) model?
  4. How do developing infants demonstrate various aspects of perceptual processing?
  5. What is “attention?” How is it directed? What is “selective attention?”
  6. When is it possible to “multi-task” and when is it not possible? Why?
  7. How is perceptual research applied in the following fields?
    • Aviation, human-computer interaction, traffic safety, architecture & design

Bernstein Study Guide Chapter 5 Pp. 126 – 157 Due 12/7 (a) and 12/8 (b)


(You will be graded for completing and correcting the study guide assignments not for how many you got right.)

1. Skim outline Pp. 126-130 – Make sure you know underlined terms and that they are in your notes.

2. Meaningful Flashcards of ALL Key Terms Pp. 130- 133 - Note examples and mnemonics (only 33 this unit)

3. Do the fill-in-the-blanks key terms quiz on Pp. 134-135. Write the question with your answer. Check your work (P. 144) and write the correct answer for any you got wrong.

4. Review the “Learning Objectives” on Pp. 153-136 – These are good sources for possible FRQ questions.

5. Do Sample Quiz 1 on Pp. 138-141 and check your answers. For each wrong answer, write the correct answer and be sure the information is in your notes. (Answers start on P. 146)

Friday, November 20, 2009

Color Vision Simulator

How can only 3 types of color sensitive cone cells allow us to see millions of colors?
You can download a small Java application which will let you run a simulation of how Red, Green and Blue light can form all colors in our visual field at http://phet.colorado.edu/simulations/sims.php?sim=Color_Vision#topics .

Thursday, November 19, 2009

Are you a "Supertaster?"

We didn't get to this activity in class, but it is easy enough to do at home.

From http://www.thetech.org/genetics/supertaster.php

1. Draw a simple blank map of the tongue

2. Swab the blue food coloring on the front of the tongue (cover the tip and about 1/2 inch back). Have the subject move the tongue around in the mouth and swallow. This distributes the dye. Swallowing the dye is not hazardous. You will see pink circles emerge from the blue background. The pink circles are the fungiform papillae. The fungiform papillae appear pink because they do not stain.

3. Now use a hole-punched cards to take 4 or 5 samples from your partner’s tongue. Count how many papillae you find in the circle. Map these areas on your tongue drawing. What is the average number of papillae per sample?

Supertasters have an average of over 30 papillae hole punch.

Unit 4 Sensation Quiz on Monday 11/23 and Tuesday 11/24

Your homework which is due the day of the quiz is to:

Do both multiple choice sample quizzes in the Berntstein Study Guide starting on P. 108. Check your work and use it to guide your studies. Do sample quiz 1 first and use it as a guide for your studying. About a day or two before our quiz, do sample quiz 2 to see how much you have improved and to target your remaining studying.


Make 40 (meaningful) Flash Cards of Key Terms from the Study Guide book. Be sure to include # 3, 4, 6, 9, 10, 17, 20, 22, 23, 33, 36, 37, 38, 39, 41, 43, 46, 49, 53, 54, 55, 56, 58,60, 61, 62, 63, 65, 66, 67, 69, 70 - You should select the other 8 terms on your own based on those concepts you are having the hardest time remembering.

Remember, distributed practice is best.

Tuesday, November 17, 2009

Sensation - Chapter 4 Part 3 due Wed. 11/18 and Fri. 11/20

Bernstein Text Chapter 4, Part 3 – Pp. 131- 149 (Through Chapter Review)

Follow the reading instructions you received the first week of class and take Cornell notes as you read. As you take your notes remember to DRAW DIAGRAMS of important images, write your own examples, write your own mnemonic devices and write questions you think of. Your notes (and your brain) should contain the answers the following questions when you are done with this assignment:

Smell and Taste – The Chemical Senses Pp. 131-136

1. Define olfaction and gustation (and olfactory and gustatory)

2. What triggers olfactory receptors?

3. How many different types of olfactory receptors are there?

4. Describe the path signals from the olfactory receptors follow as they enter the brain and are processed.

5. Which brain structure usually associated with sensation is NOT involved with olfaction?

6. Explain the function of pheromones and the vomeronasal organ?

7. What are taste receptors called and where are they located?

8. How many taste buds are in a typical person? To what flavors are they sensitive?

9. How are supertasters different from normal people?

10. What are the components of flavor?

11. What is anosmia?

12. What is capsasin? Explain one theory of why people eat spicy foods.

13. Explain some adaptive (evolutionarily advantageous) functions of smell and taste.

Somatic Senses and the Vestibular System Pp. 137-145

14. What are the Somatic Senses?

15. Describe how touch receptors are different from most other neurons.

16. Explain sensory adaptation of touch receptors. Why is it evolutionarily adaptive?

17. Explain how weight and location are coded in the sense of touch.

18. Describe an example of how touch and temperature can interact.

19. Compare A-delta fiber pain and C fiber pain.

20. How does pain cause arousal? What structure is activated which would wake you up if someone poked you with a pin while you slept?

21. Explain how Gate Control Theory and natural analgesics explain pain relief.

22. What evidence is there that acupuncture relieves pain?

23. Define proprioception and kinesthesia.

24. Describe the structure and function of the vestibular system.

http://www.sumanasinc.com/webcontent/animations/content/vestibular.html

The above link is to an excellent animation which will help you understand the vestibular system.

Thursday, November 12, 2009

A Psychology Journal Created by High School Students

http://www.whitmanpsych.com/

From the home page: "We are a dedicated team of individuals bent out on assisting other students publish their works in the field of psychology. The Journal is nationally recognized by many of the leading pioneers in psychology and is open to all students!

The Journal accepts black and white photo submissions for the cover as well for the inner folds of the current edition. Moreover, we accept research submissions within the field of psychology year round. To send in a submission, feel free to contact us at whitmanpsych@gmail.com."

Read through some of the articles in the current issue about topics ranging from how animals understand numbers to how religious faith affects drug use at here.

If you are interested in proposing an idea for submission to this prestigious high school journal please see me to discuss your idea make a plan to get it done.

Sensation - Chapter 4 Part 2 and Sensation Coloring Diagrams due Mon. 11/16 and Tue. 11/17

Color both the Ear and Eye coloring diagrams according to the directions. Note: Only color the structures underlined on the coloring plates. Read through all the text, but only focus and color those key structures.


Unit 4: Sensation – Part 2 – Vision (10 pts)


Bernstein Text Chapter 4, Part 2 – Pp. 117 -131 (through Synesthesia)

Follow the reading instructions you received the first week of class and take Cornell notes as you read. As you take your notes remember to DRAW DIAGRAMS of important images, write your own examples, write your own mnemonic devices and write questions you think of. Your notes (and your brain) should contain the answers the following questions when you are done with this assignment:

Light and Structure of the Eye Pp. 117-119

1. Describe the physical dimensions of light.

2. How do the physical properties of light relate to brightness and color?

3. How does visible light fit into the electromagnetic spectrum?

4. Describe and DRAW the major structures of the eye.

5. Describe the accessory structures and sensory receptor of the eye.

6. What is accommodation in vision?

Converting Light into Images & Visual Pathways Pp. 119 – 122

http://www.sumanasinc.com/webcontent/animations/content/receptivefields.html

The above link is to an excellent animation which may help you understand some of the more complex aspects of visual processing in the retina.

7. What is visual transduction and were does it take place?

8. What are photoreceptors and photopigments? Where are they located?

9. What causes your eyes to take time to adjust when you go from bright sunlight to a dark room? What is this adjustment called?

10. Compare the structure, function and distribution of rods and cones.

11. What is the fovea?

12. How does “lateral inhibition” improve the sharpness and contrast of our vision?

13. What do ganglion cells do? Why would vision be impossible without them?

14. How do ganglion cells correspond to the visual field?

15. Describe how the center-surround fields of ganglion cells improves vision.

16. Why does everyone have a blind spot?

17. Describe how the optic nerves separate and cross at the optic chiasm.

18. How is spatial coding demonstrated in the retina, the LGN and the visual cortex?

19. Explain how parallel processing can analyze different types of visual information from the same visual data in the Lateral Geniculate Nucleus (LGN.)

20. What are “feature detectors?”

21. Define the physical properties of color: hue, saturation and brightness.

22. Explain the “Trichromatic Theory of Color Vision.”

23. Explain the “Opponent-Process Theory of Color Vision.”

24. Describe and explain color blindness.

25. What is synesthesia?

Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Sensation - Chapter 4 Part 1 due Thurs. 11/12 and Fri. 11/13

Notes on the reading (10 pts): Due November 12 and 13

Bernstein Text Chapter 4, Part 1 – Pp. 104 -116 (through frequency-matching theory)

Follow the reading instructions you received the first week of class and take Cornell notes as you read. As you take your notes remember to DRAW DIAGRAMS of important images, write your own examples, write your own mnemonic devices and write questions you think of. Your notes (and your brain) should contain the answers the following questions when you are done with this assignment:

General Sensation Pp. 104-109

1. What is a phantom limb?

2. Explain whether sensation is objective or subjective?

3. What is a “sense” and what is “sensation?”

4. Describe the difference between sensation and perception.

5. Define accessory structure, transduction, sensory receptor and adaptation.

6. What types of energy do our senses gather?

7. What role does the thalamus play in sensation? Which sense does not go through it?

8. Explain what “coding” is in sensory systems. Describe temporal and spatial coding.

9. Define the “doctrine of specific nerve energies.”

10. What is “contralateral representation?”

11. What is “topographical representation?”

Hearing Pp. 109-116

See http://www.medindia.net/animation/ear_anatomy.asp for good ear animation.

12. Define “sound.” Why is it true that, “In space, no one can hear you scream?”

13. Compare low-frequency and high-frequency sounds and their waveforms.

14. Describe physical characteristics of sound: amplitude, wavelength and frequency.

15. Describe psychological dimensions of sound: loudness, pitch and timbre (tamber).

16. Describe the ear’s accessory structures: pinna, ear canal, tympanic membrane

17. Describe the bones of the middle ear (malleus, incus, stapes), and the oval window.

18. Describe the structures on the inner ear: the cochlea, hair cells and basilar membrane.

19. What is the auditory nerve?

20. Describe different causes of deafness: conduction deafness and nerve deafness.

21. Where and what is the “primary auditory cortex?”

22. What are “preferred frequencies” and “frequency maps” in the auditory cortex?

23. Explain how intensity of sound is coded.

24. Compare “place theory” and “frequency matching theory” of frequency coding.

Saturday, November 7, 2009

Sunday, November 1, 2009

Monday, October 26, 2009

A Molecule of Motivation, Dopamine Excels at Its Task - From the New York Times

Here is an interesting article about the ever-so-popular neurotransmitter, dopamine.

The article suggests that dopamine is not just a "pleasure" or "reward" neurotransmitter, but also the key to motivation. For example, rats with very low levels of dopamine will starve to death even in the presence of food... they just don't seem motivated to eat it. If you put it in their little ratty mouth they'll eat, but if they have to walk a bit, forget about it. They just starve to death.

Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Great Nerve Transmission Website


The Nobel Prize website has a fantastic animated explanation about how nerve signals work. Click on the link to go step-by step through nerve anatomy, action potentials, and neurotransmitters. If you don't "get it" in class or when you read the book, this site may be just the thing you need to help you understand. Why do they have it on the Nobel Prize site? Because the people who figure out how these things work get Nobel Prizes in medicine.

http://nobelprize.org/educational_games/medicine/nerve_signaling/game/nerve_signaling.html

Saturday, October 17, 2009

Split Brain Experiments -- How we learn about the localizatilon of language centers in the left hemisphere.

Left visual field to Right Hemisphere: Right visual field to Left Hemisphere.

The Nobel Prize Organization has a great website showcasing the work of prize recipients. You can learn about Sperry's split brain experiments there at http://nobelprize.org/educational_games/medicine/split-brain/background.html .

A new article in Scientific American Magazine describes how we are continuing to learn about the brain, thanks to people who are being treated for severe epilepsy.

Rare Procedure Pinpoints the Location, Speed and Sequence of the Brain's Language Processes -


You can learn more about the language processing capabilities of Broca's Area (and parts of the left temporal lobe.) Again, as in the Sperry and Gazzaniga studies, sufferers of severe epilepsy have allowed us to learn details about how the human brain functions.


Thursday, October 15, 2009

Human Brain Coloring Diagrams Due Along with the Ch. 3 Reading


Use the coloring diagram packet you received in class to learn basic structure and function of major brain areas and neurons. Read all the directions carefully and use colored pencils to underline the text and color the diagrams according to the instructions.

Complete the first four plates (1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and 2-1) by 10/19 (a-day) and 10/20 (b-day)

Complete the last three plates (2-4, 2-5, and 2-7) by 10/21 (a-day) and 10/22 (b-day)

As you are studying Chapter 3 in the book, take a break and do some coloring for a while and then go back to the reading. This will add some variety to your work and get more parts of your brain processing the material.

If you want to buy your own copy of the book we use in class you can get it on Amazon.com. You can also choose a different version... there are several out there some of which can be purchased very inexpensively.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_1_11?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=human+brain+coloring+book&sprefix=human+brain

Wednesday, October 14, 2009

Latino Mental Health Conference - El Arte de Sentirse Bien

You can receive extra credit points and service learning hours if you attend this conference and create a presentation or blog post about it for our class.

On Sunday October 25, 2009, The Naomi Ruth Cohen Institute will sponsor its third annual latino mental health conference, entitled: "El Arte de Sentirse Bien" (The Art of Feeling Well). Conference participants can sign up to learn about entering a new culture, depression in children and adolescents, partner/spouse relationships, communication between children and parents, employment stress, and substance abuse. Please note that this conference is for the general public. It is completely free, in Spanish, and child care is available. Please pass the word on to anyone who may benefit from a supportive ear-clients, friends, colleagues, etc-and anyone who works with Spanish-speaking clients.

El Arte de Sentirse Bien

Third Annual Latino Mental Health Conference

Sunday, October 25, 2009
2:15-4:30pm

St. Nicholas Roman Catholic Church
806 Ridge Ave. Evanston, IL

*Pre-Registration is NOT Required*

**This conference is in Spanish**


For More Information:

Naomi Ruth Cohen Institute
for Mental Health Education
at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology
325 North Wells St., Room 742
Chicago, Illinois 60654


www.naomicohenfoundation.org

The Naomi Ruth Cohen Foundation was founded in 2002 by Larry and Marilyn Cohen as a tribute to their daughter, Naomi, who took her own life after struggling with bipolar disorder. In 2008, the foundation formally affiliated with The Chicago School and became the The Naomi Ruth Cohen Institute for Mental Health Education. The Naomi Ruth Cohen Institute regularly partners with mental health professionals to promote education, anti-discrimination, and advocacy as a means of reducing the stigma of mental illness. Since its beginning, the Naomi Ruth Cohen Institute has reached thousands of community members through conferences, workshops, and other outreach programming.

Tuesday, October 13, 2009

Get an AP Exam Prep Book

One great way to study for our quizzes and then for the AP Exam is to use an Exam Prep book. You can check public libraries or, better yet, purchase one of you own so you can highlight and write in it. You can find them at any big bookstore or online at sites like Amazon.com.

You can often buy them used for just a few dollars... a few dollars well spent. You don't necessarily need the newest version since the exam does not change that much from year to year.

You can see some of the options and read reviews written by other students on Amazon.com
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=ap+psychology+exam&x=0&y=0

Bernstein Ch. 3 - Biological Basis Reading Assignment.

Cornell Notes on Ch. 3 due on 10/19 (a-day) and 10/20 (b-day)
Study Guide and FlashCards due on 10/21 (a-day) and 10/22 (b-day)

Monday, October 5, 2009

Research Methods Quiz - Thurs 10/8 (a) and Fri 10/9 (b)

The ~ 30 question multiple choice, closed note quiz will cover Bernstein Chapter 2 and our class work on research methods.

Study Bernstein Chapter 2 and all your class notes about research methods. Use the Bernstein Study Guide to quiz yourself to check for understanding and then re-study the areas you were weak in.

Review your reading assignment sheet to make sure you can meet all your learning objectives.

Study your flashcards with a friend by quizzing each other.

Decide how many points higher you want to score on this quiz than the last quiz and do what it takes to achieve that goal. Remember you need to be scoring around 80% or better now to build the foundation of knowledge you need for the AP exam.

Friday, October 2, 2009

CHECK YOUR PSYCH BLOG LINK!

Please find your name in the "AP Psych Scholars" section of my blog and check to make sure your blog is up there. If you made a blog, but it is not linked to here please send me the blog address via e-mail or as a comment on this post.


If you have not yet made your blog do it NOW. You can find the instructions in the archives of this blog. If you have questions or are having trouble e-mail me or see me Monday after school. Your grade will be adversely effected if you don't get this done before progress reports Update: (Some of you still have not checked your links!!!)

Reading Scatter Plots and Understanding Correlations - 1st Period Due Tues 10/6

Blog Post Assignment #2 - Reading Scatter Plots and Understanding Correlations.

Also, look at the post below this one so you can finish the "Shoe Size Statistics" sheet you received in class today.

This post only contains 1st Period Data - 7thPeriod data is in a previous post.

On your own academic blog please discuss each of the following graphs. Be sure to address the questions below each graph. Please don't copy the questions or number your answers, rather, you should write a paragraph or two in complete sentences so your reader knows what you are talking about. In your post you should either copy the graph images from my blog or link to them in your post using the link button (it looks like a little chain link just to the right of the Text color button at the top of your "new post" window.) Be sure to e-mail me to let me know your blog post is up. Put your full name and "AP Psych-Per 1" in the subject line and in the body of your e-mail. Review the "how to e-mail a teacher" post on my blog before you send your e-mail.


Above is the data we collected about our shoe sizes vs our heights. Can you see a relationship? Is there a correlation? If so, is it positive or negative? Does shoe size cause height to change? Does height cause shoe size to change? Does correlation imply causality?



What can we see from the above scatter plot of hair length vs. height? Is there a correlation? If so, is it positive or negative; strong or weak? What information about the students in our class does this graph give you? Are there a few "outliers" or extreme data points that seem unusual? If you throw them out of the data set what does the correlation look like? What other information would be helpful to interpret the data?

(click on the graphs to enlarge)

Descriptive Statistics and creating a histogram for 1st Period - Due Tues 10/6

This data is from 1st period AP Psych.

1. The three columns below represent the data we collected in class today. The right column is Shoe Size, the middle column is Hair Length and the right column is Height. All the numbers are rounded to the nearest centimeter. Use these numbers to fill out the front of your "Shoe Size Statistics" sheet you received in class today. (If you don't have this sheet, it is available with our other documents on our website... click the link on the upper right corner of this blog.)

PLEASE NOTE each column has been sorted in ascending order, the data from different columns in the same row does NOT represent the same individual.

2. Create the histogram showing the frequency of shoe size distribution in our class on the back of your "Shoe Size Statistics" sheet.

Shoe

23

23

24

24

24

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

26

26

26

27

27

27

27

28

28

28

29

29

30

30

32

Hair

1

1

2

2

5

5

8

9

13

14

19

20

23

23

29

29

30

30

34

35

35

40

40

43

43

50

50

51

52

Height

149

152

152

152

154

155

157

157

158

159

160

160

162

162

165

165

167

167

168

169

169

169

169

169

173

176

177

179

181

Thursday, October 1, 2009

Reading Scatter Plots and Understanding Correlations - 7th Period Due 10/5

Blog Post Assignment #2 - Reading Scatter Plots and Understanding Correlations.

This post only contains 7th Period Data - 1st Period data will be in the next post.

On your own academic blog please discuss each of the following graphs. Be sure to address the questions below each graph. Please don't copy the questions or number your answers, rather, you should write a paragraph or two in complete sentences so your reader knows what you are talking about. In your post you should either copy the graph images from my blog or link to them in your post using the link button (it looks like a little chain link just to the right of the Text color button at the top of your "new post" window.) Be sure to e-mail me to let me know your blog post is up. Put your full name and "AP Psych-Per 7" in the subject line and in the body of your e-mail. Review the "how to e-mail a teacher" post on my blog before you send your e-mail.



Above is the data we collected about our shoe sizes vs our heights. Can you see a relationship? Is there a correlation? If so, is it positive or negative? Does shoe size cause height to change? Does height cause shoe size to change? Does correlation imply causality?



What can we see from the above scatter plot of hair length vs. height? Is there a correlation? If so, is it positive or negative; strong or weak? What information about the students in our class does this graph give you? Are there a few "outliers" or extreme data points that seem unusual? If you throw them out of the data set what does the correlation look like? What other information would be helpful to interpret the data?

(click on the graphs to enlarge)

Tuesday, September 22, 2009

Unit 2 - Research Methods Due 9/30 (a-day) 10/1 (b-day)

Reading assignment notes check (10 pts)

Study Guide assignment (10 pts)

Flash Cards assignement (10 pts)

Objectives (think about these as you read):

1. What methods do psychologists use to learn about behavior and mental processes?

2. How is “Critical Thinking” important for psychological research?

3. What role do theories play in psychological research?

4. Describe and compare the following research methods: Naturalistic Observation, Case Studies, Surveys, Correlational Studies, Experiments.

5. Explain the ethical issues in using human and animal subjects for psych research.

6. What statistics do psych researchers use?

7. What are the ethical guidelines psych researchers must follow?

Bernstein Text Chapter 2 Pp. 27 - 57

Read and take Cornell notes based on your reading instructions. Write down how long it takes you to complete the reading and notes so you can know what to expect in terms of studying for future chapters.

Bernstein Study Guide Chapter 2 (starts on P. 26)

1. Review the chapter based on your reading instructions.

2. Key Term Flashcards: All terms 2 – 35 (yes, really)

3. Additional Flashcards: Family Studies, Twin Studies, Adoption Studies, Five important ethical guidelines for psych research.

4. Written assignments to turn in on separate paper with full heading. Copy the questions and write the answers. Check your answers and grade your paper before class. Write the correct answer for each one you got wrong.

Concepts and Exercises No. 1: Q 1-8 (matching on p. 36)

Multiple Choice Sample Quiz 1 Q 1-20 (starts on p. 38) – just write the letter for each question, you don’t need to copy these questions.

Monday, September 21, 2009

How to send an e-mail to a teacher - REALLY!

In your high school career you are beginning to communicate via the internet with your teachers. It is crucial to follow some basic guidelines when you do this for a couple of reasons.

First, your teachers are busy people (as are most students) and e-mail should be a tool which makes their lives easier rather than more difficult.

Second, and more important, your e-mails are a projection of your professionalism. Get used to writing professional e-mails so you are taken seriously by teachers, college professors, peers, employers, and others you think should take you seriously.

1. Write a subject line that tells the reader what the e-mail is about. For email about classes, include the class name and period in your subject line.

Don’t: SUBJECT: (don't leave it blank or put something like "hi")

Do: SUBJECT: Question about observation assignment Hon. Bio. Per. 5

2. Sign the e-mail with your full name and your class and period number. Many students have e-mail addresses which don’t include their name, and remember that teachers have about 150 students so be sure they know who you are!

Don’t: seeya J ;-)

Do: Sincerely, Juan Gonzalez, Hon. Bio. Per. 5

3. Write in a professional manner. Use standard capitalization and punctuation. Use your computer’s spell checker and proof-read your email before you send it. Remember, using ALL CAPITALS is like YELLING in an email.

Don’t: yo mr c wazup wat u giv 4 homwurk 2day

Do: Hi Mr. Cantor. I am absent today because I’m pretty sick. Can you please e-mail me any notes from class and our assignment? I’ll be sure to bring a note from my grandma so my absence is excused.

4. Only send appropriate emails. Please don’t forward chain letters or other Spam. Please don’t send joke or “inspirational” e-mails unless they relate to our class. Many chain letters are urban myths. Before you feel the need to forward the message about a new computer virus or free laptop giveaway, check http://snopes.com/ to see if it is true or not. Also, I don’t “friend” current students on Facebook, so please don’t send a friend request until you graduate from NGHS.

i.e. I’d love to see a clean and school appropriate joke or cartoon about evolution that involves Charles Darwin and Sigmund Freud bungee jumping, but I don’t want to see any joke that might be mean, racist, sexist, obscene, rude, offensive, or otherwise irrelevant to our class.

5. If you send a paper or other assignment to a teacher learn how to send it as an Attachment. Name your file something that makes sense and is unique to your paper.

Don’t: biologypaper.doc (every student might name it this)

Do: JuanGonzalezSciFairBioPer05.doc

The computers at school can’t read “.docx” and other unusual file types. Always use “save as” to save your document as a .doc or a .rtf file before attaching. If you can’t do that, you can copy and paste your document into the body of your e-mail, assuming it isn’t too long and full of graphs etc.

6. If you don’t have internet access at home there are other options:
1. Use the library at school during lunch or after school.
2. Use the Chicago Public Library – There are several branches near school.
3. Use a computer at a friend or relative’s house.
4. Arrange to stay after school in my room, or another teacher's room to use the computer.

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

History of Psychology Presentations Sept. 19(a) Sept. 21(b)



Work on your "History of Psych" presentations. Be sure to save your work often and e-mail me your powerpoint when you are done. Be sure to PRACTICE what you plan to say so you don't read off your slides and bore everyone to distraction.

(Image from http://havefunwithpsychology.com/)

Friday, September 11, 2009

Unit 1 Reading assignment due Sept. 14 (a) and 15 (b)

We will be checking the notes and study guide assignment for Unit 1 - Introducing Psychology on Monday Sept. 14, and Tuesday Sept. 15. Be sure to follow the instructions on the reading assignment sheet which can be found with our other documents on Our AP Psych site. Bring your flashcards to class so I can check those too.

If you are a new member of the class and you don't have a textbook, please let me know as soon as possible. I have already notified the school and we are trying to fix the problem. In the mean time, if you have a study guide, use that as much as you can and find a "study buddy" who has a book you can share.

Finally, If you were given a copy of the book, "5 Steps to a 5" please bring it to school so we can return it. Those books will be used in the classroom and should not have been signed out to students.

Thursday, September 10, 2009

All our documents will be online

You will find "Important Links" at the top right of this blog page. >>>>>

If you click on the link there to our AP Psych Website you will find links to all the important documents we will be using in our class. The syllabus and summer assignment are there for those who are new to the class, as well as the first reading assignment, table of contents and reading instructions.

Sunday, September 6, 2009

Welcome back to School!


It's a new school year and it's going to be great. I've looked at many of the blogs you created over the summer and am impressed by some of the insightful and interesting posts you wrote.

If you didn't make the July 20th deadline for your blog post please get it done ASAP and send me an e-mail explaining why you didn't make the deadline. For example if you didn't register for the class until August 10th, I'll take that into account.

Some students have asked if I accept late work and the answer is, "YES!" I take points off if the work is late for a reason other than an excused absence, but the point of this class is to LEARN and you can't learn if you don't do the work. If you know ahead of time that you may not get an assignment in on time, talk to me BEFORE it's due so we can make an arrangement.

I'll collect the Phineas Gage study guide questions and check your notes on Chapter 1 of the Bernstein text on the first day of class, which is Sept. 8th (a-day) or Sept. 9th (b-day.)

Finally, check out this recently discovered photo of Phineas Gage (above.) The photo was probably used in an advertisement for an appearance that Mr. Gage was promoting. Did you know who it was as soon as you saw the photo?